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8 definitions by josifer

 
1.
"Ugandan discussions" is a euphemism for sex coined during the early 1970s by the satirical British magazine "Private Eye".

The basis of the term arose at a party in London hosted by Neal Ascherson at which Irish moralist and journalist Mary Kenny, during her early, wild phase, spent some time upstairs with a former Ugandan government minister. On rejoining the other guests, Kenny explained their absence by saying they were "upstairs discussing Uganda".
— Where are they?
— I believe they slipped away for some private Ugandan discussions.

— She looks like she was dragged through a hedge backwards!
— She was upstairs discussing the situation in Uganda, allegedly.
po Josifer Јануар 18, 2012
 
2.
To get sex.

In Ireland, a man may say he got his hole when he got some sex.

Women may appropriate the phrase to mean they got laid too, despite the fact that they are the party with the hole in question, but this is uncommon.
I got me hole last night; met this bird at a bar; she was great!

I saw you leaving the party with that woman. Did you get your hole?
po Josifer Октобар 21, 2009
 
3.
In Ireland, polatic means drunk.
He was totally polatic by 7 o'clock!
po Josifer Април 18, 2011
 
4.
Route one means to drive a football towards an opponent's goal by a long kick upfield from the rear.

The technique is denigrated as an unattractive ploy by weak teams who lack the skill or confidence to move the ball along the field by talented play between team mates.

The long boot or "welly" by a goalkeeper or defending player bypasses many of the opposing players who may be dangerously skilful. It can be seen a shot in the dark, a hopeful search for a member of one's own team far upfield.
The goal came by route one; it wasn't pretty, but it counted just the same.
po Josifer Септембар 5, 2009
 
5.
Definition: This insult from Dublin in Ireland means:

* Get lost!
* Nonsense!
* I disagree.
* I don't believe you.

Delivery: "Giddup" is said in a rising tone; "de yaard" in a falling tone. Correctly delivered, it is implacably dismissive. Usually spat in reaction to something said, it operates best as a violent, caustic ejaculation.

Like many insults, it may be used cordially between friends.

Genesis: It was used in the mid-1960s as a command to get up the school yard at St. Pius X National School in Templeogue, Dublin. The school consisted of prefabricated buildings arranged around the church on College Drive before a proper school was built and opened at Fortfield Park in 1968. During class breaks, children playing in the yard were kept away from the road.

Two older students stood at the sides of the yard to corral the younger ones. When children ran across the invisible line between the sentries, they were roared at to "Get up the yard!" Giddy children shouted the phrase back as a taunt, and it evolved into an all-purpose insult.

Distribution: The first graduates of the school infiltrated secondary schools around Dublin in 1970, carrying the formula with them. The city was rapidly overcome by the phrase.

Culprit: If proper building funds had been available from the start, the language would not have been enriched by this backslap; its genesis was economic. The Minister for Education responsible at the time for school-building funds was Paddy Hillery.
* Get up the yard, eejit!
po Josifer Април 18, 2011
 
6.
Old variant of word wank, meaning masturbate. Can be a noun or verb: a whank; to whank.

Defined by the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition, 1989:

wank, n. (a.) Also whank.
1. Of a male: (an act of) masturbation. This word and its derivatives are not in polite use. 1951 Dict. Slang (ed. 4) 1220/1 Whank, (male) self-abuse: low: from ca. 1870. Perhaps echoic.
I had a whank earlier; feel more relaxed now.

I was going home to whank, but was distracted by the house that was on fire, and the escaping giraffes.
po josifer Мај 29, 2010
 
7.
(Britain, Ireland): A leg that is painfully numbed, stiffened, or cramped by impact such as by a deliberate or accidental kick or other blow.

Known as a charley horse or charlie horse in the United States where it can also mean a blow to the arm, often given during horseplay.
* He lashed out with his foot and gave him a dead leg.
po Josifer Март 15, 2012